5 Things Your Bladder Wishes It Could Tell You about Urinary Incontinence

Is there anything you can do to support healthy bladder functions? If only your bladder could talk it would give you some good advice about how to keep your pee in, how to strengthen your pee muscles and more importantly, definitive steps you can take to help make sure you have complete control over your bladder.

Here are 5 points your bladder would want to tell you.

Bladder Talk

1. Lose some weight. Extra weight, adds extra pressure on the bladder. The extra pressure can cause you to want to pee several times, and if your pee muscles are weak, there is increased incidence of leakage. According to studies, a weight loss of 5% to 10% should strongly be considered a first-line therapy for urinary incontinence in women. Not only does a healthy weight support healthy bladder functions but keeping yourself fit offers immense benefits for the heart and just about every other vital organ.

Get active, eat more vegetables and fruits, cut down on sugar. If you’re truly motivated, there’s nothing that can stop you from shedding off those extra pounds and feeling great about yourself.

2. Add more fiber to your diet. Constipation can be one of the major causes of stress incontinence. Hard stool presses on the bladder increasing the “urgency” to go or causing leakage. Prevent constipation by increasing your intake of fiber, drinking plenty of fluids and getting at least 30 minutes of exercise every day. Fiber can be found in leafy green vegetables, salads, and whole grains. Nutrition experts recommend an intake of 20 to 25 grams of fiber daily. If this is not possible, try taking a fiber supplement to avoid constipation but avoid over-the-counter laxatives. Taking them for a day or two is okay but more than that can cause problems.

3. Discover your Kegel muscles. Kegel exercise is also known as pelvic floor exercises. If you don’t know where your Kegel muscles, try stopping the flow of urine midway while peeing and you’ll soon discover where they are and how you can contract and relax them. According to Mayo Clinic, “Kegel exercises can help you prevent or control urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor problems.” The best part is you can do these exercises anywhere, any time. Take a look at how easy it is to do them. If you still aren’t sure, you can see a physical therapist who will help you strengthen your pelvic floor muscles.

4. Tame your overactive bladder. If you have to pee every hour or even sooner you may have an overactive bladder. (If you’re not sure you whether you have an overactive bladder, take this quiz) Different foods can work like a diuretic causing you to want to want to pee frequently. Make a note of all the things you eat for 2 or 3 days and which ones make you want to pee more! Common foods include coffee, alcoholic beverages, acidic fruit juices, carbonated beverages and some prescription medication. Try decaf coffee, and substitute your orange juice for apple juice and see if it makes a difference.

5. Drink cranberry juice every day. If your bladder could talk it would tell you to drink cranberry juice. It’s true – experiments have shown that cranberry juice helps avoid urinary tract infections so prone to women. Cranberries contain flavonoids that help “unstick” bacteria from the walls of the urethra. Cranberries can help with constipation, too.

The tips above may help you gain better control over your bladder. For those, who want to be absolutely confident and avoid embarrassing leaks, adult diapers for women are one of the best solutions. With modern-day technology, women don’t have to settle for incontinence products that are bulky. Wellness Briefs has come out with a product that uses principles from NASA technology. This latest technology keeps you feeling dry and odor-free for a complete 8 hours. Order your free sample today.

There’s a lot of information out there about heart health, cognitive health and even nutrition and diet. But what about your bladder? Most women have experienced the occasional pee that comes out when you’re exercising, sneezing, laughing or coughing. Does it get worse? It can. As age sets in, urinary incontinence may become a more serious problem requiring professional attention and the use of incontinence products for women.

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